Death In Ten Minutes by Fern Riddell

The image of the Suffragette is one that has been honed for a century so that a very specific image is presented.  It is one of proper women, the ideal of the Englishwoman, fighting for her rights, in the right way.  This is not how it was and in her biography of Kitty Marion, Fern Riddell shows us that Mrs Banks had some far more interesting friends and how the Pankhursts made sure they were hidden in the shadows of history.

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The Last Battle by Peter Hart

The final few months of The Great War have rarely got the focus of those that proceeded them.  The final offensive that finally silenced the guns and ended the slaughter was one in great contrast to the static game of inches of the years before.  In The Last Battle, histoian Peter Hart superbly manages to show us the great scope of Foch's great offensive while putting us in the mud with the men tasked with marching to the "green fields beyond".

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You Were Never Really Here

Lynne Ramsey returns with a brutal, difficult film that has a very genuine heart.  Joaquin Phoenix is Joe.  Joe recovers girls who have been trafficked.  When Joe takes on a job to recover the daughter of a New York senator, things take a dark and violent turn.  While not an easy watch, the heart Ramsay and Phoenix instil make this a remarkable film.

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Breakout at Stalingrad by Heinrich Gerlach

After 60 years languishing in the Russian State Military Archive, Heinrich Gerlach's novel of his experiences in Stalingrad is finally published.  Uncompromising and oppressive, Breakout at Stalingrad is a remarkable testament to the horror war and the affect on the men caught up in it.

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Phantom Thread

Paul Thomas Anderson returns with Daniel Day-Lewis (in what is possibly his final role) as Reynolds Woodcock.  Reynolds is a dressmaker in 1950's London whose latest muse, Alma (a sumptuous Vicky Krieps), gets deeper under his skin than he expects or believes is possible.  Phantom Thread is an astonishing acheivement by all involved.

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NT Amadeus

Michael Longhurst's production of Peter Shaffer's Amadeus returns to the National Theatre.  With Lucian Msamati as Salieri, Adam Gillen as Mozart and an incredible Flreu de Bray as Cavalieri, it is an ambitious, barnstorming and utterly, utterly wonderful production.  

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RSC Imperium Part 1 and 2

Robert Harris' Cicero Trilogy is brought to the stage by the Royal Shakespeare Company in Imperium Parts One and Two.  In six plays, we see the rise and fall of Cicero and the last days of the Roman Republic.  Robert McCabe is masterful as the Roman orator and the cast bring the fractious world to vivid life before us.  The RSC has created a masterful adaptation of Harris' superb novels.

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Dogs of War by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Rex wants to be a good dog.  He lives for the moments when his master tells him he is a good dog.  Rex’s master gives Rex things to do.  Rex, because he is a good dog, does the tasks he is given.  In Adrian Tchaikovsky's novel, we view a rapidly changing world from the viewpoint of the cause of that change, a seven foot dog with guns on his back.

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Boney's Review of 2017

2017 is almost done, but it hasn't been all bad, right?  In this post, I look back at the things I've loved and discovered in 2017.  I look at Books, Films and Podcasts as these are the things that have taken up most of my free time.  Hope you like it.

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Star Wars: The Last Jedi

A spoiler free review of our latest journey to A Galaxy Far, Far Away.  Star Wars: The Last Jedi picks up where The Force Awakens left us.  The Resistance is having to escape and Rey has found Luke Skywalker.  Will the escape succeed?  Will Luke train Rey?  What are those Porg things?  These and many other questions may well be answered in the two and half hours of our latest adventure.

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The Earth Gazers by Christopher Potter

The race to go faster, further and higher has intoxicated man since before Icarus took to his wings.  In the 20th Century, man didn’t just take to the air, but slipped it’s confines for space.  A very select few (a total of 24 men) were able to gaze back and see our home in all it’s glory.  With The Earth Gazers, Christopher Potter looks how those men got up there and how what they felt was as important as what they saw.

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How to Build a Car by Adrian Newey

In motor Racing, Adrain Newey's name ranks among the greats.  He is not one for the cameras of a race weekend, but his autobiography is wonderfully engaging, funny and honest.  From building Lotus kit cars with his dad through to 10 World Championships with three teams, Newey's tale is fascinating.  He takes us through the highs and terrible lows of his life and career, framing it all against the cars we have watched going round in circles for all these years.  How to Build a Car is essential reading for any racing fan.

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Gnomon by Nick Harkaway

Nick Harkaway's latest novel crosses thousands of years and yet never leaves the mind of the victim at the centre of his tale.  With Gnomon, Harkaway looks at our world and the issues we face from oblique angles, in turn making us look at our own path from eyes we may not have considered or have even wanted too.  Gnomon is a masterful tale.

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America City by Chris Beckett

America City, Chris Beckett's first novel since leaving Eden, is a fantastic look at how the information we receive affects our decisions.  We believe we are smart enough to know what is going on, but are we?  In a wonderfully complex work of speculative fiction, Beckett's ambitious America City crafts a world as deep as Eden and yet as relatable as now.

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Blade of the Immortal - LFF Review

Takashi Mikke's 100th film arrives with a flurry of blades, bloodworms and vengeance.  Blade of the Immortal is Miike’s 3rd chanbara (“sword fighting) film and is based on the long running manga by Hiroaki Samura.  Miike’s take on the source material is frenetic, fascinating and wonderful, truly befitting his century of films.

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A Legacy of Spies by John le Carre

With A Legacy of Spies, John le Carre returns to the scene of the novel that put him on the map.  While the much publicised return of George Smiley is making the headlines, the story is set upon the shoulders, in my opinion, of one of his most interesting characters, Smiley’s right hand, Peter Guillam.

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Munich by Robert Harris

September 1938.  The world teeters on the brink of another war.  Hitler is eyeing the Sudetenland and is hours away from mobilisation.  In London, Chamberlain is doing everything to keep the piece.  A summit is arranged in Munich and two men travel there with plans of their own in Robert Harris' fantastic latest novel.

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The Women Who Flew For Hitler by Clare Mulley

Clare Mulley's new biography looks at two incredible, yet very different women who were pinoneering Test Pilots for the Third Reich.  In The Women Who Flew For Hitler, Mulley looks at what drove these women in a male dominated flying world and the very different directions they chose under a Nazi flag.

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Dunkirk

Heroic failure is something that Britain has always done well.  With Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan has crafted an incredible film about an incredible event.  With that as his setting, Nolan may have made his best movie yet.

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