Posts tagged Biography
Death In Ten Minutes by Fern Riddell

The image of the Suffragette is one that has been honed for a century so that a very specific image is presented.  It is one of proper women, the ideal of the Englishwoman, fighting for her rights, in the right way.  This is not how it was and in her biography of Kitty Marion, Fern Riddell shows us that Mrs Banks had some far more interesting friends and how the Pankhursts made sure they were hidden in the shadows of history.

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The Women Who Flew For Hitler by Clare Mulley

Clare Mulley's new biography looks at two incredible, yet very different women who were pinoneering Test Pilots for the Third Reich.  In The Women Who Flew For Hitler, Mulley looks at what drove these women in a male dominated flying world and the very different directions they chose under a Nazi flag.

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The Pigeon Tunnel by John Le Carre

A year on from Adam Sisman's exhaustive biography, John Le Carre takes up his own pen to tell the stories he wants too from his life.  Entertainingly written and yet somewhat light on it's feet, The Pigeon Tunnel manages to captivate as a good Le Carre does and tell you nothing that you don't already know.  Some would call the the perfect autobiography.

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John le Carre by Adam Sisman

Literary biography can be a tricky thing.  An academic writing about another academic, author or poet, can usually result in a book that is worthy and as dry as the sahara.  For some, these are wonderful books, for me, I'd rather eat one than wade through it.  In a few cases, the author's life is more interesting than their creations.  But, very rarely, do they mesh as well as David Cornwell's.

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Why Sinatra Matters by Pete Hamill

We live in an age where an artist's "Reienvention" is hailed as something special, something remarkable.  Every time Lady Gaga appears in a new frock, the media goes nuts, because, that is what their readers expect.  The thing is, Madonna did it before and David Bowie did it better than all but one, the man who never really reinvented himself, but was always there, Frank Sinatra.  To my generation, he was "Old People's Music".  We knew Nancy from the constant reworking of "These Boots Are Made For Walkin'" and kids today probably know Frank Sinatra Jr better for his appearances on Family Guy better than they have ever known his dad.  But through all the static and preconceived ideas, the music, THAT voice, still moves us and causes us to remember.

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