Posts tagged Book
The Deadly Trade by Iain Ballantyne

The submarine is one of man’s greatest, and most deadly, inventions. In The Deadly Trade: The Complete History of Submarine Warfare from Archimedes to the Present, Iain Ballantyne takes us from the theory of the underwater warship, through Jules Vern to the U-Boot and today’s Intercontinental Ballistic Submarine. Where Ballantyne’s superior work excels is to look at the development of the submarine through the eyes of the men who took them to war and who, mostly, never came home.

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Nightfall Berlin by Jack Grimwood

Tom Fox returns to action in Jack Grimwood’s Nightfall Berlin. Having survived Moscow, Fox is sent to East Berlin to escort home a British defector who has express a desire to return home. For some reason, everyone is in agreement for this. There is a memoir. What the memoir contains could derail everything in the thawing environment of the mid-80’s. For Fox, nothing so simple as bringing an old man home is in his future.

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Death In Ten Minutes by Fern Riddell

The image of the Suffragette is one that has been honed for a century so that a very specific image is presented.  It is one of proper women, the ideal of the Englishwoman, fighting for her rights, in the right way.  This is not how it was and in her biography of Kitty Marion, Fern Riddell shows us that Mrs Banks had some far more interesting friends and how the Pankhursts made sure they were hidden in the shadows of history.

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How to Build a Car by Adrian Newey

In motor Racing, Adrain Newey's name ranks among the greats.  He is not one for the cameras of a race weekend, but his autobiography is wonderfully engaging, funny and honest.  From building Lotus kit cars with his dad through to 10 World Championships with three teams, Newey's tale is fascinating.  He takes us through the highs and terrible lows of his life and career, framing it all against the cars we have watched going round in circles for all these years.  How to Build a Car is essential reading for any racing fan.

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The Plots Against Hitler by Danny Orbach

The men and women who resisted Hitler have been cast as heroes and villains of both the left and right.  The conspirators and their actions have been remembered in black and white, with the viewer choosing the colours with which to paint them.  In Danny Orbach’s new history of the resistance, The Plots Against Hitler, he very convincingly shows us that rather than pure saints or sinners, the complexity and contradictions of the conspirators makes them that most difficult of things to digest, human.

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The Periodic Table of Cocktails by Emma Stokes

Cocktails are a wonderful, delightful and subjective thing.  The latest addition to the the ever increasing library of Cocktail tales is Emma "Gin Monkey" Stokes' scientific look at drinking.  The science may be beyond me, but the book and its take on the cocktail reference genre is an impressive, even if she does spoils some Castia-specific secrets.

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Why Sinatra Matters by Pete Hamill

We live in an age where an artist's "Reienvention" is hailed as something special, something remarkable.  Every time Lady Gaga appears in a new frock, the media goes nuts, because, that is what their readers expect.  The thing is, Madonna did it before and David Bowie did it better than all but one, the man who never really reinvented himself, but was always there, Frank Sinatra.  To my generation, he was "Old People's Music".  We knew Nancy from the constant reworking of "These Boots Are Made For Walkin'" and kids today probably know Frank Sinatra Jr better for his appearances on Family Guy better than they have ever known his dad.  But through all the static and preconceived ideas, the music, THAT voice, still moves us and causes us to remember.

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The Martian by Andy Weir

I have a terrible habit of discovering great books late through film.  So, it is through another film I discover something I wish I'd picked up when it was released.  Ridley Scott's new film, due in November, is an adaptation of Andy Weir's The Martian.  It looks really good, even if the cast cross over with Interstellar's big "surprise" reveal is unfortunate.  I'll embed the trailer at the bottom, but it's the book were are going to chat about here.  Well, maybe, gush.  I read it in one sitting.

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