Posts tagged Book Review
Normandy '44 by James Holland

D-Day can tend to be remembered by the beaches, the bocage and the Tigers. In his new history of the Normandy campaign, James Holland looks at the myths of the campaign and reminds us that without the incredible logistics machine supporting the tip of the spear, the liberation would never have gotten very far inland at all.

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The Colour of Time by Dan Jones and Marina Amaral

In Marina Amaral and Dan Jones’ The Colour of Time, we have two historians bringing the colour back to our history, one which we have become so used to seeing in monochrome. The subtle and powerful marriage of the images and text brings an excitement to each turn of the page that makes this a very special book.

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The Deadly Trade by Iain Ballantyne

The submarine is one of man’s greatest, and most deadly, inventions. In The Deadly Trade: The Complete History of Submarine Warfare from Archimedes to the Present, Iain Ballantyne takes us from the theory of the underwater warship, through Jules Vern to the U-Boot and today’s Intercontinental Ballistic Submarine. Where Ballantyne’s superior work excels is to look at the development of the submarine through the eyes of the men who took them to war and who, mostly, never came home.

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Nightfall Berlin by Jack Grimwood

Tom Fox returns to action in Jack Grimwood’s Nightfall Berlin. Having survived Moscow, Fox is sent to East Berlin to escort home a British defector who has express a desire to return home. For some reason, everyone is in agreement for this. There is a memoir. What the memoir contains could derail everything in the thawing environment of the mid-80’s. For Fox, nothing so simple as bringing an old man home is in his future.

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Death In Ten Minutes by Fern Riddell

The image of the Suffragette is one that has been honed for a century so that a very specific image is presented.  It is one of proper women, the ideal of the Englishwoman, fighting for her rights, in the right way.  This is not how it was and in her biography of Kitty Marion, Fern Riddell shows us that Mrs Banks had some far more interesting friends and how the Pankhursts made sure they were hidden in the shadows of history.

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How to Build a Car by Adrian Newey

In motor Racing, Adrain Newey's name ranks among the greats.  He is not one for the cameras of a race weekend, but his autobiography is wonderfully engaging, funny and honest.  From building Lotus kit cars with his dad through to 10 World Championships with three teams, Newey's tale is fascinating.  He takes us through the highs and terrible lows of his life and career, framing it all against the cars we have watched going round in circles for all these years.  How to Build a Car is essential reading for any racing fan.

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A Legacy of Spies by John le Carre

With A Legacy of Spies, John le Carre returns to the scene of the novel that put him on the map.  While the much publicised return of George Smiley is making the headlines, the story is set upon the shoulders, in my opinion, of one of his most interesting characters, Smiley’s right hand, Peter Guillam.

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Before The Fall by Noah Hawley

When a plane falls from the sky, it is a violent reassertion of gravity, of which, there is little escape.  We hope that it is quick and the people on board know very little, but we rarely know much about the lives of those on board.  When it is a small aircraft, those on board come under much closer scrutiny as, if it is an executive jet, they tend to be rather well off.  This is the premise of Noah Hawley's latest novel, Before The Fall.

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The Periodic Table of Cocktails by Emma Stokes

Cocktails are a wonderful, delightful and subjective thing.  The latest addition to the the ever increasing library of Cocktail tales is Emma "Gin Monkey" Stokes' scientific look at drinking.  The science may be beyond me, but the book and its take on the cocktail reference genre is an impressive, even if she does spoils some Castia-specific secrets.

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The Silk Roads by Peter Frankopan

We live in a world where our focus is constantly drawn East.  We see terrible things happen, our leaders contemplate doing terrible things and dropping equally terrible things in response.  We look at what we call the Middle East as a modern problem, as if our focus has only recently turned to it.  But, living in the West we forget that everything has come from the East.  While Rome was falling, the East was flourishing.  Before we worried about oil and gas, we sent gold and silver East for silks and knowledge.  We owe everything to the East.  And yet, with our minds firmly on our own importance, we tend to think of it as a dusty backwater.  The Silk Road, to modern minds, is a website on that bit of the internet you can't find when you pop it into Google.

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