Posts tagged LFF
Blade of the Immortal - LFF Review

Takashi Mikke's 100th film arrives with a flurry of blades, bloodworms and vengeance.  Blade of the Immortal is Miike’s 3rd chanbara (“sword fighting) film and is based on the long running manga by Hiroaki Samura.  Miike’s take on the source material is frenetic, fascinating and wonderful, truly befitting his century of films.

Read More
The Last Laugh - LFF Review

Can you make a good joke about the Holocaust?  Nazis, by all means.  But the Holocaust itself?  That is the premise of Ferne Pearlstein's superb documentary on the subject.  To broach such a subject, you need to have the roster to bring weight to the subject and my goodness, Pearlstein has gathered a who's who of the great and greater of Jewish comedy.  A film that could have relied on the humour doesn't and the survivors interviewed make this the best film I saw at this years London Film Festival.

Read More
Son of Saul - LFF Review

You never walk into a film cold.  You always carry something with you.  These days, with them interwebs, it is even harder not too.  Trailers tell every bit of a film, the days of mystery are gone.  Yet, when you walk into a film about the Holocaust, no matter what the film's pedigree, there is a sense of foreboding.  When you are walking into a Cannes Grand Prix winner and your fellow festival goers troop in with buckets of popcorn, frankly, I thought I was in the wrong cinema.  I'd opted for a beer, which, as it turns out, was not strong enough.

Read More
The Salvation - LFF Thrill Gala

There are fewer triggers in life that get me into a cinema quicker, other than a western and Mads Mikkelsen.  Starting with Westerns, well that is easy, it is my Granma's fault.  She loved a western, good, bad or indifferent, she was nut when it came to them.  And the Rockford Files, for that matter.  Going round to my grandparents would mean a good western, usually staring The Duke or Clint.

Read More
The Keeping Room - LFF Review

The American Civil War in popular history is remembered as one of the "Good Wars".  The North fighting for emancipation and freedom, the South for slaves, cotton and molasses.  And to a greater and lesser degree, that was the case, the big picture.  The problem with any war is in the detail, there are no good wars.

Read More
Monsters: Dark Continent - LFF World Premier Review

How do you write a review of a film that is still running around your mind?  Given that the film in question is the sequel-of-sorts to Gareth Edwards stunning 2010 Monsters, it may surprise you to hear that this film, marketed to an extent (the trailer is HERE), as a sci-fi actioner, asks some rather profound questions about the world we live in today.

Read More
Looking Back - Jodorowsky's Dune

It being the time of year where everyone is looking back and compiling lists, I'm struggling to do the same.  This year has been an odd one to say the least.  The opening seven months being the happiest I can remember.  Not wanting to descend into hyperbole, it was an amazing time and while the seeds for its end were being sowed, I can say without doubt that I never thought I'd find that joy in my life.  However, it's course ran, and while I wish I could have acted on a few things differently, August bought a sea change and, frankly, a measure of time to fill and wait for it to pass.

Read More