Posts tagged Review
The Psychology of Time Travel by Kate Mascarenhas

Kate Mascarenhas’ sumptuous debut novel finds a woman in a locked room who has been shot to death. Taking a fractured narrative, a cast of strong, very interesting women, Mascarenhas weaves a a tale that is as much about the woman in the room as it is the women working their way towards the answer in the past, present and future.

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You Were Never Really Here

Lynne Ramsey returns with a brutal, difficult film that has a very genuine heart.  Joaquin Phoenix is Joe.  Joe recovers girls who have been trafficked.  When Joe takes on a job to recover the daughter of a New York senator, things take a dark and violent turn.  While not an easy watch, the heart Ramsay and Phoenix instil make this a remarkable film.

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Breakout at Stalingrad by Heinrich Gerlach

After 60 years languishing in the Russian State Military Archive, Heinrich Gerlach's novel of his experiences in Stalingrad is finally published.  Uncompromising and oppressive, Breakout at Stalingrad is a remarkable testament to the horror war and the affect on the men caught up in it.

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Dogs of War by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Rex wants to be a good dog.  He lives for the moments when his master tells him he is a good dog.  Rex’s master gives Rex things to do.  Rex, because he is a good dog, does the tasks he is given.  In Adrian Tchaikovsky's novel, we view a rapidly changing world from the viewpoint of the cause of that change, a seven foot dog with guns on his back.

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Boney's Review of 2017

2017 is almost done, but it hasn't been all bad, right?  In this post, I look back at the things I've loved and discovered in 2017.  I look at Books, Films and Podcasts as these are the things that have taken up most of my free time.  Hope you like it.

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How to Build a Car by Adrian Newey

In motor Racing, Adrain Newey's name ranks among the greats.  He is not one for the cameras of a race weekend, but his autobiography is wonderfully engaging, funny and honest.  From building Lotus kit cars with his dad through to 10 World Championships with three teams, Newey's tale is fascinating.  He takes us through the highs and terrible lows of his life and career, framing it all against the cars we have watched going round in circles for all these years.  How to Build a Car is essential reading for any racing fan.

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A Legacy of Spies by John le Carre

With A Legacy of Spies, John le Carre returns to the scene of the novel that put him on the map.  While the much publicised return of George Smiley is making the headlines, the story is set upon the shoulders, in my opinion, of one of his most interesting characters, Smiley’s right hand, Peter Guillam.

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Before The Fall by Noah Hawley

When a plane falls from the sky, it is a violent reassertion of gravity, of which, there is little escape.  We hope that it is quick and the people on board know very little, but we rarely know much about the lives of those on board.  When it is a small aircraft, those on board come under much closer scrutiny as, if it is an executive jet, they tend to be rather well off.  This is the premise of Noah Hawley's latest novel, Before The Fall.

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The Periodic Table of Cocktails by Emma Stokes

Cocktails are a wonderful, delightful and subjective thing.  The latest addition to the the ever increasing library of Cocktail tales is Emma "Gin Monkey" Stokes' scientific look at drinking.  The science may be beyond me, but the book and its take on the cocktail reference genre is an impressive, even if she does spoils some Castia-specific secrets.

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SPECTRE

A New Bond film is a special thing.  You see all kinds of people excited for something that at the best of times is plain silly fun.  With the forth Daniel Craig Bond film, SPECTRE, upon us, we have been having a bit of a golden time with our old 007.  While I had issues with Skyfall, hopes for the second Sam Mendes Bond are high.  SPECTRE has been out for over a month now and by the half full cinema I saw it in, it is engaging with the masses and raking in a fair amount of coin.  The thing is, I really can't see why?  This is a Bond film that makes no sense whatsoever and that is based against the history of a franchise where sense has never been a reliable commodity.

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The Silk Roads by Peter Frankopan

We live in a world where our focus is constantly drawn East.  We see terrible things happen, our leaders contemplate doing terrible things and dropping equally terrible things in response.  We look at what we call the Middle East as a modern problem, as if our focus has only recently turned to it.  But, living in the West we forget that everything has come from the East.  While Rome was falling, the East was flourishing.  Before we worried about oil and gas, we sent gold and silver East for silks and knowledge.  We owe everything to the East.  And yet, with our minds firmly on our own importance, we tend to think of it as a dusty backwater.  The Silk Road, to modern minds, is a website on that bit of the internet you can't find when you pop it into Google.

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Bridge of Spies

Whenever a Steven Spielberg movie lands, you know two things, it will be beautifully made and it will get lost in sentimentality with a sweeping score to tell exactly how you should feel.  A film by Steven Spielberg is cinematic manipulation done to perfection.  Spielberg is the master of this and you always get your money's worth, despite the quality of the overall product.  Now, we have Spielberg turning his hand to the cold war thriller and finally gets his hands on Mark Rylance, a move which works a dream.

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Slow West

Having grown up with Westerns, you'd think I'd come to them predisposed to loving them.  Not so much.  For every good Western, there are a saddlebag of worthless entries to go alongside.  But, the Western is the one genre where, against the backdrop of a huge, never ending sky, just about any tale can be told.  The Western in itself has been around since before cinema and hold a place etched in the public's mind.  Given that the period depicted in most Westerns, normally called "The Old West", lasted only about four years, it has been a magnet for our imagination since the dime novel of the 19th Century.  The Western has evolved, slowly, from Cowboys and Indians, to White Hats versus Black Hats, to Revisionism and then to Realism. 

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The Face Of An Angel

When is a film about a murder, not a film about a murder?  Well, when it is The Face of an Angel.  Michael Winterbottom's new film tries to look at a murder from the viewpoint of someone looking at the people who are creating the viewpoint we consume.  Lost yet?  It is an ambitious attempt to try and get past the hyperbole and look at the impact of a murder.  And the murder they have chosen is one of the most well documented murders of our times, that of Meredith Kercher.

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