Posts tagged Science Fiction
Dogs of War by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Rex wants to be a good dog.  He lives for the moments when his master tells him he is a good dog.  Rex’s master gives Rex things to do.  Rex, because he is a good dog, does the tasks he is given.  In Adrian Tchaikovsky's novel, we view a rapidly changing world from the viewpoint of the cause of that change, a seven foot dog with guns on his back.

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Nothing Lasts Forever

What happens when Saturday Night Live's star writer gets a shot at writing and directing his first feature?  He casts an 18 year old unknown alongside Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd and unleashes the crazy.  Nothing Lasts Forever is wonderful madness and I have to thank The Prince Charles and Zach Galligan for a great Sunday night out.

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Mother of Eden by Chris Beckett

One of the great things about being a book addict is the joy of stumbling across something total new.  A decade or more a ago, an ill advised membership to the Sci-Fi and Fantasy Book Club (do book clubs even exist any more?) brought with it a book of the month called The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch.  Not being one for "fantasy", I intended to send it back, but general lethargy stopped me.  This turned out to be a good thing as the world of Locke and Jean is an amazing place to spend time in.  Likewise, about a year ago, a random Amazon recommendation offered up Dark Eden by Chris Beckett.

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Monsters: Dark Continent - LFF World Premier Review

How do you write a review of a film that is still running around your mind?  Given that the film in question is the sequel-of-sorts to Gareth Edwards stunning 2010 Monsters, it may surprise you to hear that this film, marketed to an extent (the trailer is HERE), as a sci-fi actioner, asks some rather profound questions about the world we live in today.

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Woollybucks, Starflowers and Leopards... Oh, My!

Very rarely do you buy a novel on a whim and find yourself truly captivated by every line.  A couple years ago, in the days of constant travelling, I felt the need to escape my rather bland world of the inside of airliners flying to yet another bland customer office.  I can’t remember what lead me to find Chris Beckett’s Dark Eden, possibly a review in the Books section of the every trusty The Week, but whatever it was, it was one of those choices that you are always happy you made.

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