Posts in Film
The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot

I’m sure the pitch Robert D. Krzykowski, the writer-director of The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot, made for his debut feature hinged a lot on the title. The second half of the pitch, where Krzykowski turned the tables must have been the harder sell. But this film is very much about the titular ‘Man’ and because of it, The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then Bigfoot is an unexpected and utter joy.

Read More
You Were Never Really Here

Lynne Ramsey returns with a brutal, difficult film that has a very genuine heart.  Joaquin Phoenix is Joe.  Joe recovers girls who have been trafficked.  When Joe takes on a job to recover the daughter of a New York senator, things take a dark and violent turn.  While not an easy watch, the heart Ramsay and Phoenix instil make this a remarkable film.

Read More
Phantom Thread

Paul Thomas Anderson returns with Daniel Day-Lewis (in what is possibly his final role) as Reynolds Woodcock.  Reynolds is a dressmaker in 1950's London whose latest muse, Alma (a sumptuous Vicky Krieps), gets deeper under his skin than he expects or believes is possible.  Phantom Thread is an astonishing acheivement by all involved.

Read More
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

A spoiler free review of our latest journey to A Galaxy Far, Far Away.  Star Wars: The Last Jedi picks up where The Force Awakens left us.  The Resistance is having to escape and Rey has found Luke Skywalker.  Will the escape succeed?  Will Luke train Rey?  What are those Porg things?  These and many other questions may well be answered in the two and half hours of our latest adventure.

Read More
Blade of the Immortal - LFF Review

Takashi Mikke's 100th film arrives with a flurry of blades, bloodworms and vengeance.  Blade of the Immortal is Miike’s 3rd chanbara (“sword fighting) film and is based on the long running manga by Hiroaki Samura.  Miike’s take on the source material is frenetic, fascinating and wonderful, truly befitting his century of films.

Read More
Dunkirk

Heroic failure is something that Britain has always done well.  With Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan has crafted an incredible film about an incredible event.  With that as his setting, Nolan may have made his best movie yet.

Read More
Baby Driver

For as long as he can remember, the great chase films were whirling around in Edgar Wright's mind (as they do us all).  Great films like Walter Hill’s The Driver, John Landis’ The Blues Brothers and Richard C. Sarafian’s incredible Vanishing Point to name but three.  For twenty odd years, Wright has  wanted to honour them and put his own, very singular, stamp on the genre.  With Baby Driver he has crafted something special, his very own car chase musical.

Read More
Their Finest

Their Finest does that difficult thing of being funny about a period and reverential about it at the same time.  And above it all is Gemma Arterton.  Her performance is subtle, humorous, strong and committed.  Their Finest is one of those increasingly rare occasions where a film happily sits across generations and manages to please all.

Read More
The 24 Hour War

A look back on the epic battle between Ford and Ferrari in the late 1960's at Le Mans.  The 24 Hour War recounts the troubled birth of the legendary Ford GT40 and the lengths the Ford Motor Company went to to beat the world over the course of a day.  While a solid racing documentary, the focus is disingenuous and Amerocentric, which does a disservice the international racers that made the GT40 what it was.

Read More
Rogue One

Disney's newest gamble is Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, a film set between the events of Episode III and in the weeks leading up to Episode IV.  Dropping the film into the middle of the cannon is risky and needs a steady hand.  It is a gamble that has paid off, correcting the overkill of Abrams approach and shedding a new and complex light onto the heart of the rebellion.

Read More
Nothing Lasts Forever

What happens when Saturday Night Live's star writer gets a shot at writing and directing his first feature?  He casts an 18 year old unknown alongside Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd and unleashes the crazy.  Nothing Lasts Forever is wonderful madness and I have to thank The Prince Charles and Zach Galligan for a great Sunday night out.

Read More
The Last Laugh - LFF Review

Can you make a good joke about the Holocaust?  Nazis, by all means.  But the Holocaust itself?  That is the premise of Ferne Pearlstein's superb documentary on the subject.  To broach such a subject, you need to have the roster to bring weight to the subject and my goodness, Pearlstein has gathered a who's who of the great and greater of Jewish comedy.  A film that could have relied on the humour doesn't and the survivors interviewed make this the best film I saw at this years London Film Festival.

Read More
La La Land - LFF Review

I went to the cinema the other evening and I cried.  Not a terribly rare occurrence, easily sentimentally manipulated movie-goer that I am.  But this night, I saw something magical.  Film is in itself is a magic trick.  Twenty-four still images being shown to you a second that your brain interpenetrates as movement in the light.  The movement in the light that is La La Land reminded me of what cinema truly can be.

Read More
Miss Stevens

Miss Stevens is a film that I didn't think I'd see again.  It is joyous, full of heart and populated with a believable, relatable cast of characters that subtlety draws you in, breaks your heart and then pops it back together again.  The directorial debut of Julia Hart is plainly wonderful.

Read More
The Magnificent Seven

The latest remake of The Magnificent Seven is out now.  What ever you do, do not take a shot of mezcal for every western cliche you see, it'll kill you.  It is an enjoyable film but, with all these great pieces in place, it is a cliche ridden missed opportunity that could have been so much better.

Read More
Tickled

When you hear about a documentary about the world of Competitive Endurance Tickling, that response you just had, yep that one just then, was probably the same as mine.  And yet, when you watch David Farrier and Dylan Reeve's film, you see that it is not a film about extreme sports or tickling for that matter, but very much about the state of America, class and the vices of privilege.  Tickled, it is needless to say, is a terribly odd and rather scary journey.

Read More
Star Trek Beyond

There is an old Trekker adage that Star Trek movies follow the even formula, as in, all the even numbered Trek films are good, Khan, Voyage Home, Undiscovered Country, First Contact etc.  With the new, JJ Abrams inspired “Kelvin Timeline” Star Trek series, the hope was that all the films would be good.  But, the even numbered film formula has devolved into the law of diminishing returns; Star Trek Beyond, the 13th Star Trek film, unfortunately lives up to both adages.

Read More
Look Who's Back

Look Who's Back is a smart and incredibly timely satire.  This is adaptation as it should be, taking a strong source and expanding on it, yet keeping the "soul" of the source material.  Look Who's Back really sends a shudder down your spine, while your laughing consistently all the way through.  This film is an odd, scary and brilliant combination.

Read More
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

I thought, when, many, many years ago, the film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies was announced that I, zombie aficionado that I am (a zombnado if you will) would be the target demographic for this adaptation.  I had bought the book, twice.  I'd enjoyed the book both times I'd read it, but as I looked around the faded auditorium at the Cineworld Haymarket, I realised I may be in the wrong room.

Read More